Much closer to the Standard Model

18/03/2013

ResearchBlogging.org

Today, the daily from arxiv yields a contribution from John Ellis and Tevong You analyzing new data presented at Aspen and Moriond the last two weeks by CMS and ATLAS about Higgs particle (see here). Their result can be summarized in the following figure

Ellis & You: agreement with Standard Modelthat is really impressive. This means that the updated data coming out from LHC constraints even more the Higgs particle found so far to be the Standard Model one. Another impressive conclusion they are able to draw is that the couplings appear to be proportional to the masses as it should be expected from a well-behaved Higgs particle. But they emphasize that this is “a” Higgs particle and the scenario is well consistent with supersymmetry. Citing them:

The data now impose severe constraints on composite alternatives to the elementary Higgs boson of the Standard Model. However, they do not yet challenge the predictions of supersymmetric models, which typically make predictions much closer to the Standard Model values. We therefore infer that the Higgs coupling measurements, as well as its mass, provide circumstantial support to supersymmetry as opposed to these minimal composite alternatives, though this inference is not conclusive.

They say that further progress on the understanding of this particle could be granted after the upgraded LHC will run and, indeed, nobody is expecting some dramatic change into this scenario from the data at hand.

John Ellis, & Tevong You (2013). Updated Global Analysis of Higgs Couplings arXiv arXiv: 1303.3879v1


From arxiv today

25/10/2011

ResearchBlogging.org

Today the daily from arxiv is particularly rich. A couple of papers are from my friend Marco Ruggieri, one in collaboration with Raul Gatto (see here) and the other is the contribution to Paris Conference proceedings (see here). Marco is currently using a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model to understand the behavior of hadronic matter at high temperatures and densities. These works imply the use of a chiral chemical potential that has the benefit to permit an identification of the critical end-point on the lattice without the infamous sign problem, as Marco showed quite recently (see here). These works are well founded as the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model is the right low-energy limit of QCD (see here and here).

Another theoretical confirmation on my result on the beta function for Yang-Mills theory appeared today (see here). This author works out classical solutions to Yang-Mills theory and derives a “beta function” of the form 4\alpha_s, exactly the one I get (see here). This result marks evidence of an infrared trivial fixed point for this theory and the correctness of the mapping on a scalar field. This paper gives just a clue as the treatment remains at a classical level.

Last but not least, the complete Coleman’s lectures appeared finally on arxiv (see here). We have to give a great thank to Bryan Chen and Yuan-Sen Ting for their excellent work. These lectures are a reference today yet and I hope they will see the light in a book with some addenda from most of Coleman’s famous students.

Raoul Gatto, & Marco Ruggieri (2011). Hot Quark Matter with an Axial Chemical Potential arXiv arXiv: 1110.4904v1

Marco Ruggieri (2011). Quark Matter with a Chiral Chemical Potential arXiv arXiv: 1110.4907v1

Marco Ruggieri (2011). The Critical End Point of Quantum Chromodynamics Detected by Chirally
Imbalanced Quark Matter Phys.Rev.D84:014011,2011 arXiv: 1103.6186v2

Marco Frasca (2008). Infrared QCD Int.J.Mod.Phys.E18:693-703,2009 arXiv: 0803.0319v5

Kei-Ichi Kondo (2010). Toward a first-principle derivation of confinement and chiral-symmetry-breaking crossover transitions in QCD Phys. Rev. D, 82 065024 (2010) arXiv: 1005.0314v2

Ding-fang Zeng (2011). Confinings of QCD at purely classic levels arXiv arXiv: 1110.5054v1

Marco Frasca (2010). Mapping theorem and Green functions in Yang-Mills theory PoS FacesQCD:039,2010 arXiv: 1011.3643v3

Sidney Coleman (2011). Notes from Sidney Coleman’s Physics 253a arXiv arXiv: 1110.5013v1


It was twenty years ago today . . .

16/08/2011

ResearchBlogging.org

With these beautiful words starts a recollection paper by the founder of arXiv, Paul Ginsparg. This is worth the reading as this history spans a number of years exactly overlapping the computer revolution that definitely changed our lives. What Paul also changed through these new information tools was the way researchers should approach scientific communication. It is a revolution that is not stopped yet and all the journals I submit my papers have a link to arXiv for direct uploading of the preprint. This change has had also a great impact on the way these same journals should present to authors, readers and referees as well at their website.

For my readers I would like just to point out how relevant was all this for our community with the Grisha Perelman’s case. I think all of you are well aware that Perelman never published his papers on a journal: You can find both of them on arXiv. Those preprints paid as much as a Fields medal and a Millenium prize. Not bad I should say for a couple of unpublished papers. Indeed, it is common matter to have a paper largely discussed well before its publication and often a preprint becomes a case in the community without not even seeing the light of a publication. It is quite common for us doing research to console colleagues complaining about the harsh peer-review procedure by saying that today exists arXiv and that is enough to make your work widely known.

I was a submitter since 1994, almost at the very start, and I wish that the line of successes of this idea will never end.

Finally, to prove how useful is arXiv for our community, I would like to point out to you, for your summer readings a couple of papers. The first one is this from R. Aouane, V. Bornyakov, E.-M. Ilgenfritz, V. Mitrjushkin, M. Müller-Preussker, A. Sternbeck. My readers should know that these researchers always do a fine work and get important results on their lattice computations. The same happens here where they study the gluon and ghost propagators at finite temperature in the Landau gauge. Their conclusion about Gribov copies is really striking, comforting my general view on this matter (see here), that Gribov copies are not essential not even when one rises the temperature. Besides, they discuss the question of a proper order parameter to identify the phase transition that we know exists in this case.

The next paper is authored by Tereza Mendes, Axel Maas and Stefan Olejnik (see here). The idea in this work is to consider a gauge, the \lambda-gauge, with a free parameter interpolating between different gauges to see the smoothness of the transition and the way of change of the propagators. They reach a volume of 70^4 but Tereza told me that the errors are too large yet for a neat comparison with smaller volumes. In any case, this is a route to be pursued and I am curious about the way the interpolated propagator behaves at the deep infrared with larger lattices.

Discussions on Higgs identification are well alive yet ( you can see here). take a look and enjoy!

Paul Ginsparg (2011). It was twenty years ago today … arXiv arXiv: 1108.2700v1

R. Aouane, V. Bornyakov, E. -M. Ilgenfritz, V. Mitrjushkin, M. Müller-Preussker, & A. Sternbeck (2011). Landau gauge gluon and ghost propagators at finite temperature from
quenched lattice QCD arXiv arXiv: 1108.1735v1

Axel Maas, Tereza Mendes, & Stefan Olejnik (2011). Yang-Mills Theory in lambda-Gauges arXiv arXiv: 1108.2621v1


A physics software repository

12/04/2011

Scientific publishing has undergone a significant revolution after Paul Ginsparg introduced arXiv. Before this great idea, people doing research used to send preprints of their works to some selected colleagues for comments. This kind of habit was costly, time consuming and reached very few people around the World until the paper eventually went through some archival journal. Ginsparg’s idea was to use the web to accomplish this task making widely known papers well before publication to all the community. This changed the way we do research as it is common practice to put a paper on arXiv before submission to journals. This has had the effect to downgrade the relevance of these journal for scientific communication. This is so true that Perelman’s papers on Poincaré conjecture never appeared on literature, they are just on arXiv, but the results were anyhow generally acknowledged by the scientific community. This represents an extraordinary achievement for arXiv and shows unequivocally the greatness of Ginsparg’s idea.

Of course, research is not just writing articles and get them published somewhere. An example is physics where a lot of research activity relies on writing computer programs. This can happen on a lot of platforms as Windows, Mac, Linux or machines performing parallel computations. Generally, these programs are relegated to some limited use to a small group of researchers and other people around the World, having similar problems, could be in need of it but are forced to reinvent the wheel. This happens again and again and often one relies on the kindness of colleagues that in some cases could have not the good will to give away the software. This situation is very similar to the one encountered before arXiv come into operation. So, my proposal is quite simple: People in the scientific community having the good will to share their software should be stimulated to do so through a repository that fits the bill. This could be easily obtained by extending arXiv itself that already contains several papers presenting software written by our colleagues that, aiming to share, just put there a link. But having a repository, it could be easier to maintain versions as already happens to paper and there would be no need to create an ad hoc site that could be lost in the course of time.

I do not know if this proposal will meet with success but it is my personal conviction that a lot of people around the World has this need and this could be easily realized by the popularity of certain links to download programs for doing computations in physics. This need is increasingly growing thanks to parallel computation made available to desktop computers that today is a reality. I look forward to hear news about this.


Today in arXiv

08/04/2011

ResearchBlogging.org

After the excitation for the findings at Tevatron, we turn back to routine. Of course, I have never forgotten to cast a glance at arXiv where it is crystal clear the vitality of the physics community. I want to put down these few lines to point to your attention a couple of papers appeared today on the preprint archive. Today, Nele Vandersickel uploaded her PhD Thesis (see here). She has got her PhD on March this year. Nele was one of the organizers of the beautiful and successful conference in Ghent (Belgium) where I was present last year (see here, here and here). But most important is her research work with the group of Silvio Sorella and David Dudal that is the central theme of her thesis. Nele does an excellent job in presenting a lot of introductory material, difficult to find in the current literature, beside her original research. Sorella and Dudal have accomplished an interesting research endeavor by supporting the Gribov-Zwanziger scenario, at odds in the initial formulation with lattice data, with their view that condensates must be accounted for. In this way, Gribov-Zwanziger scenario can be taken to agree with lattice computations.  These theoretical studies describe a consistent approach and these authors were able to obtain the masses of the first glueball states. I would like to conclude with my compliments for the PhD reached by Nele and for the excellent wotk her and the other people in the group were able to realize.

The other fine paper I have found is a report by a group of authors, “Discoverig Technicolor”, giving a full account of the current situation for this theoretical approach to the way particles acquire their masses. As you know, the original formulation of the Higgs particle that entered into the Standard Model contains some drawbacks that motivated several people to find better solutions. Technicolor is one of these. One assumes the existence of a set of Fermions with a self-interaction. We know that this kind of models, as Nambu-Jona-Lasinio is, are able to break symmetries and generate masses to massless particles. Indeed, one can formulate a consistent theory with respect to all the precision tests of the Standard Model as also discussed in this report. This means in turn that in accelerator facilities one should look for some other Fermions and their bound states that can also mimic a standard Higgs scalar boson. It is important to note that in this way some drawbacks of the original Higgs mechanism are overcome. Of course, the relevance of this report cannot be underestimated in view of the results coming out from LHC and we could know very soon if an idea like Technicolor is the right  one or not. For sure, this is time for answers in the end.

Nele Vandersickel (2011). A study of the Gribov-Zwanziger action: from propagators to glueballs arXiv arXiv: 1104.1315v1

J. R. Andersen, O. Antipin, G. Azuelos, L. Del Debbio, E. Del Nobile, S. Di Chiara, T. Hapola, M. Jarvinen, P. J. Lowdon, Y. Maravin, I. Masina, M. Nardecchia, C. Pica, & F. Sannino (2011). Discovering Technicolor arXiv arXiv: 1104.1255v1


Problems at arxiv

14/07/2009

Today I received the following message from arxiv at Cornell:

Access Denied

Sadly, you do not currently appear to have permission to access http://arxiv.org/

If you believe this determination to be in error, see http://arxiv.org/denied.html for additional information.

All the mirrors seem to work well.


500,000 and more!

06/10/2008

Cornell announced that arxiv overcome 500,000 submissions (see here). This is a key milestone. At this rate the threshold at 1,000,000 is expected for 2015. This is the undeniable proof of a great success and the evidence for a revolution in scientific publishing. Articles are all freely accessible. The future will say what other impact this will have. But already today we see a reshaping of all the publishing community to account for the very existence of arxiv.

I think this is the moment for cheers.


Paul Ginsparg and arxiv

02/10/2008

One of the greatest revolutions in scientific publishing we have witnessed in these latest years has been the invention of arxiv due to Paul Ginsparg.

A beautiful article he wrote for Physics World is appeared in the latest number of the journal (see here). This paper has been emotionally shocking for me and turned back time to the pioneering era of personal computing. I still remember the PDP-11 machine I worked on at University of Rome “La Sapienza” to compute the lifetime of K_s^0, repeating an experiment performed years before, with two other classmates.  As soon as I uncovered arxiv I partecipate to this adventure submitting my preprints to it. Indeed, you can find papers of mine there starting from 1994.

Since then arxiv has changed in a significant way introducing a web interface, endorsement and requiring registration. But we have also been part of Perelman’s story and his preprints never published but just put on arxiv. They just contain the proof of Poincare’ conjecture. And someone thinks yet preprints are not worth a publication…


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