Where we are now?

13/08/2019

Summer conferences passed by, we have more precise data on the Higgs particle and some new results were announced. So far, this particle appears more and more in agreement with the Standard Model expectations without no surprise in view. Several measurements were performed with the full dataset at 140 {\rm fb}^{-1}. Most commentators avoid to tell about this because it does not warrant click-bait anymore. At EPS-HEP 2019 in Ghent (Belgium), the following slide was presented by Hulin Wang on behalf of the ATLAS Collaboration

ZZ decay and higher resonances

There appears to be an excess at 250 GeV and another at 700 GeV but we are talking of about 2 sigma, nothing relevant. Besides, ATLAS keeps on seeing an excess in the vector boson fusion for ZZ decay, again about 2 sigma, but CMS sees nothing, rather they are somewhat on the missing side!

No evidence of supersymmetry whatsoever, neither the multiplet of Higgs nor charged Higgs are seen that could hint to supersymmetry. I would like to remember that some researchers were able to obtain the minimal supersymmetric standard model from string theory and so, this is a diriment aspect of the experimental search. Is the Higgs particle just the first one of an extended sector of electroweak (soft) supersymmetry breaking?

So, why could the slide I just posted be so important? The interesting fact is the factor 2 between the mass of this presumed new resonance and that of the Higgs particle. The Higgs sector of the Standard Model can be removed from it and treated independently. Then, one can solve it exactly and the spectrum is given by an integer multiple of the mass of the Higgs particle. This is exactly the spectrum of a Kaluza-Klein particle and it would represents an indirect proof of the existence of another dimension in space. So, if confirmed, we would move from a desolating scenario with no new (beyond standard model) physics in view to a completely overturned situation! We could send all the critics back to sleep wishing them a better luck for the next tentative.

Back to reality, the slide yields the result for the dataset of 36.1 {\rm fb}^{-1} and no confirmation from CMS has ever arrived. We can just hope that the dreaming scenario takes life.


ICHEP 2018

08/07/2018

The great high-energy physics conference ICHEP 2018 is over and, as usual, I spend some words about it. The big collaborations of CERN presented their last results. I think the most relevant of this is about the evidence (3\sigma) that the Standard Model is at odds with the measurement of spin correlation between top-antitop pair of quarks. More is given in the ATLAS communicate. As expected, increasing precision proves to be rewarding.

About the Higgs particle, after the important announcement about the existence of the ttH process, both ATLAS and CMS are pursuing further their improvement of precision. About the signal strength they give the following results. For ATLAS (see here)

\mu=1.13\pm 0.05({\rm stat.})\pm 0.05({\rm exp.})^{+0.05}_{-0.04}({\rm sig. th.})\pm 0.03({\rm bkg. th})

and CMS (see here)

\mu=1.17\pm 0.06({\rm stat.})^{+0.06}_{-0.05}({\rm sig. th.})\pm 0.06({\rm other syst.}).

The news is that the error is diminished and both agrees. They show a small tension, 13% and 17% respectively, but the overall result is consistent with the Standard Model.

When the different contributions are unpacked in the respective contributions due to different processes, CMS claims some tensions in the WW decay that should be taken under scrutiny in the future (see here). They presented the results from 35.9{\rm fb}^{-1} data and so, there is no significant improvement, for the moment, with respect to Moriond conference this year. The situation is rather better for the ZZ decay where no tension appears and the agreement with the Standard Model is there in all its glory (see here). Things are quite different, but not too much, for ATLAS as in this case they observe some tensions but these are all below 2\sigma (see here). For the WW decay, ATLAS does not see anything above 1\sigma (see here).

So, although there is something to take under attention with the increase of data, that will reach 100 {\rm fb}^{-1} this year, but the Standard Model is in good health with respect to the Higgs sector even if there is a lot to be answered yet and precision measurements are the main tool. The correlation in the tt pair is absolutely promising and we should hope this will be confirmed a discovery.

 


%d bloggers like this: